- All -          

Science Collaboration Mentors

Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN)

Roberto J. Assef

He/Him

Contact | Website

I am interested in using LSST to studying the evolution of quasars through cosmic time, particularly in context of their obscuration and luminosity function. I am also interested in using LSST to gather insights into quasar environments in a large range of luminosity and redshifts. I have been organizing the activities of the photometric redshift subgroup of the AGN Science Collaboration. I led three cadence notes early these year, focusing on the effects of the observing strategies being considered on AGN photo-z accuracy as well as on the number of quasars expected in the survey.

Manda Banerji

She/Her

Contact | Website

I am interested in understanding galaxy formation and evolution using statistical samples and multi-wavelength surveys. My past research has focused on topics as diverse as galaxy photometric redshifts and spectral energy distribution modelling, galaxy morphologies and the co-evolution of galaxies and their constituent supermassive black holes.

Franz E. Bauer

He/Him

Contact | Website

My research group at UCatólica in Santiago, Chile works on a wide variety of topics involving massive BH and galaxy classification, demographics, evolution, and accretion physics, as well as rapid/extreme extragalactic variability events (Changing-State AGN, SNe, TDEs, FXRTs, ULXs, GW events, ...), using both traditional and machine-learning approaches.

W. Niel Brandt

He/Him

Contact | Website

W. Niel Brandt is a Professor in the Department of Astronomy & Astrophysics at Penn State University. Brandt uses a wide variety of astronomical facilities to study the demographics, physics, and ecology of active galaxies and other cosmic sources. He is an author of more than 600 research papers and leads a small research group including postdoctoral researchers, graduate students, and undergraduate students. Brandt has served as the Chair/Co-Chair of the AGN SC for many years, and has also served in several other Rubin LSST positions.

Paolo S. Coppi

He/Him

Contact | Website

I started out as a theorist, working on radiation processes near black holes and in jets. Over time, my interests broadened to include understanding where and how black holes form, especially the supermassive ones. Hence my interest in multi-wavelength AGN/galaxy surveys and LSST. I am a co-developer of the EAZY photometric redshift code, and I have significant experience with high-energy astrophysics missions, e.g., I was one of the US science representatives on the ASTRO-H/Hitomi misson, and I am currently on the Fermi Users Group.

Xiaohui Fan

He/Him

Contact | Website

The University of Arizona is on the founding members of LSSTC. It is also one of the LINCC institutions, is co-located with Rubin/NORILab. There are LSST related research activties across campus as well as in collaboration with NOIRLab, covering many key science and technial areas of LSST. My main interests in LSST is on the evolution of quasars and AGN, espeially at high-redshift, in the context of using them to probe supermassive black hole growth in the early universe, black hole/galaxy co-evolution, the history of cosmic reionization and the roles AGN played in this process.

Matthew J. Graham

He/Him

Contact | Website

I am interested in the application of machine learning and other advanced statistical techniques to astrophysical time series, and particularly the study of stochastic/aperiodic variablility in astronomical populations, e.g., AGN. In recent years, I have employed RNNs, Bayesian blocks, and Slepian wavelets, for example, to study extreme AGN optical variability and SMBH binaries, significant flaring events, changing-look quasars, and candidate EM counterparts to compact object mergers in AGN disks.

Gordon Richards

Contact | Website

Drexel has been an institutional member of LSSTC since 2009 and I have been very actively engaged in the AGN Science Collaboration -- organizing the telecons since January 2019 and acting as co-chair since summer 2021. I am interested in understanding the physics of accretion disks and what LSST can do to help understand the diversity of AGN properties and the physics that drives those differences.